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Rezensionen Rezensionen

Helmut Keipert, Walter Koschmal, Alois Woldan, Christine Engel, Eva Binder, Michael Betsch

Zeitschrift für Slavische Philologie, Volume 76 (2020), Issue 1, Page 177 - 230

Witzlack-Makarevich, Kai (Hg.): Kalkierungs- und Entlehnungssprachen in der Slavia. Boris Unbegaun zum 120. Geburtstag. Berlin 2018. Besprochen von Helmut Keipert. Kahn, Andrew; Lipovetsky, Mark; Reyfman, Irina; Sandler, Stephanie: A History of Russian Literature. Oxford 2018. Besprochen von Walter Koschmal. Magocsi, Paul Robert; Petrovsky-Shtern, Yohanan: Jews and Ukrainians: A Millenium of Co-Existence. Toronto 2016. – Czerny, Boris: Contes et récits Juifs et Ukrainiens du pays Houtsoule. Présentation suivie de Récits sur les aventures du brigand houtsoule Oleksa Dovbouch et du Ba’al Shem Tov fondateur du hassidisme. Paris 2018. Besprochen von Alois Woldan. Franz, Norbert P.: „So, Sie meinen also, es gibt ihn nicht?“: Der Teufel in der russischen Literatur. Potsdam 2019. Besprochen von Christine Engel. Rusch, Mara: Die Filme von Aleksandr Sokurov. Ein Rückblick auf die russisch-europäische Geschichte. München 2018. Besprochen von Eva Binder. Ulrich, Sonja: Anredeformen im Serbischen. Wiesbaden 2018. Besprochen von Michael Betsch.


Ambiguität als Substanz Beitrag

Zur Polyvalenz des (gesprochenen) Gedichts

Walter Koschmal

Zeitschrift für Slavische Philologie, Volume 75 (2019), Issue 1, Page 209 - 230

Poems can help develop a specific culture of emotionality and tolerance due to their ambiguity. Neuroscientists have determined that when all is said and done, our emotions decide whether we use reason. A spoken poem’s aurality is therefore meant to be primarily experienced emotionally. At first, semantic ambiguities should remain and the tension they create be endured. Seven poems, two Russian (A. Voznesenskii, G. Aigi), one Sorbian (K. Lorenc), two Polish (J. Ekier, E. Tkaczyszyn-Dycki), one Belorussian (A. Razanaŭ), and one Slovak poem (M. Haugová), will demonstrate this experience. It becomes clear that poems, thanks in part to their human voice, are connected to humans’ essence and protolanguage.





Die Causa Baumann: ein Nazidichter als ,Russlandversteher‘? Beitrag

Walter Koschmal

Zeitschrift für Slavische Philologie, Volume 71 (2016), Issue 2, Page 391 - 405

Hans Baumann (1914 –1988) was possibly the most important poet and composer of Nazi songs such as “Today we have Germany, tomorrow we’ll have the entire world.” His lyrics served in the struggle against an indeterminate “East.” At the same time, Baumann saw himself as a mediator of Russian culture, though his conveyance of it suffers from the banality and vagueness of his style. He exemplifi es how German reception of Russian literature could hardly free itself from national-socialist infl uences in the 20th century. His aesthetically and poetically problematic translations of A. Ackmatova’s poems misrepresent her poetics and he similarly eliminates the aesthetic, motivic, and Russian specifi city of children’s literature. In spite of this, large German publishers and others made Baumann the most important translator of these works in post-war Germany. Baumann, Russia’s false friend, continues to discredit Russian culture with his unchanged style even after 1945. This has an adverse effect on the German reception of Russian literature.

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